News and New Work, Oct. – Nov. 2021

The following two works are part of my Precurated Legacy project that was selected for the 2022 Rotterdam Photo Festival, whose theme this year was “The Human Blueprint.” Since museums are a cross between time capsules, cultural advertising, and a catalog of samples of what we have produced. For that reason they offer a wide range of considerations for a human blueprint—though in my mind we are in no position to provide blueprints and ought to go no further than to offer notes and critiques instead.

Installation, Art Institute of Chicago
Multilayer photographic archival pigment print
36 x 52 (unframed, hanging solution provided)
Edition of 4
$445
Representation is Always a Deceit
Multilayer photographic archival pigment print
36 x 56 (unframed, hanging solution provided)
Edition of 4
$445

I believe that we experience and understand a place, as we do with so much else, by forming connections between it and our experience of other places. So I cannot fully appreciate Shilshole, where the semi-panoramic layer here was taken, with the wetlands of the Union Bay Natural Area, or two spots on the outskirts of Yellowstone, which provide the rest of the image layers here. Note that you should try to view this as large as possible to see both texture and detail like the cars on the shoreline or the pole on the jetty), which will be finer in the final print.

In Between and All Around
Multilayer photographic archival pigment print
17 x 49, unframed, edition of 6, $400
or
24 x 68, unframed, edition of 4, $600

This looks both south and west from the same point on a trail at the Union Bay Natural Area. None of the layers were shot at night. In fact, beyond the impact of the normal ambient nighttime light, the area is just northeast of Husky Stadium at the University of Washington. So the added light from that part of campus means that true night never arrives here. This condition of a seminatural reserve that cannot find night was my inspiration for this piece.

The Night Visitor, Union Bay Natural Area
Multilayer photographic archival pigment print
27 x 44 (unframed, hanging solution provided)
Edition of 5
$375

I’ve been thinking about the aging of place but had not yet produced any work on the theme until this one. We grasp the concept of geologic time through tropes of scale. So we correctly understand its comparative enormity to our lifespans by comparing grains of sand to beaches. But the tropes and the lack of a distinction between notions of the pace of time and the speed of aging trick us into thinking that the geologic time is keeps to a steady pace. And so we dangerously misunderstand our times, when the pace of geologic change is nearly the same as human time. 

Geologic Stratification, Nisqually Delta
Multilayer photographic archival pigment print
31 x 44 (unframed, hanging solution provided)
Edition of 5
$375

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *